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News > News > Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3 via Oncolytic Herpesvirus Inhibits Tumor Growth and Vascular Progenitors

Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3 via Oncolytic Herpesvirus Inhibits Tumor Growth and Vascular Progenitors

Authors: Yonatan Y. Mahller, Sachin S. Vaikunth, Maria C. Ripberger, William H. Baird, Yoshinaga Saeki, Jose A. Cancelas, Timothy M. Crombleholme, and Timothy P. Cripe

Date: December 19, 2007

Publisher: Journal of Cancer Research

Full Article: http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/68/4/1170.abstract?sid=5da09953-31ee-4c81-a6b4-cec6e24134bc

Copied from abstract: Malignant solid tumors remain a significant clinical challenge, necessitating innovative therapeutic approaches. Oncolytic viral therapy is a nonmutagenic, biological anticancer therapeutic shown to be effective against human cancer in early studies. Because matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) play important roles in the pathogenesis and progression of cancer, we sought to determine if “arming” an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) with an MMP-antagonizing transgene would increase virus-mediated antitumor efficacy.

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