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About Us > Timothy P. Cripe, MD, PhD

Timothy P. Cripe, MD, PhD

Advisor

Dr. Cripe’s clinical interests include gene and viral therapies for solid tumors in children, including brain tumors, neuroblastoma, and bone and soft tissue sarcomas. His current research focuses on developing and testing new, targeted therapies for pediatric solid tumors and translating those findings into clinical studies. He was among the first in the country to launch clinical trials of attenuated oncolytic viruses in children. Dr. Cripe completed his degrees in medicine and philosophy and received his pediatric residency training at the University of Iowa. He was a fellow in pediatric hematology/oncology at the Children’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and at the Children’s Hospital and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. He has been on faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where he was the founding director of the comprehensive sarcoma program and the medical director of the Translational Research Trials Office. Dr. Cripe is voted among the “Best Doctors in America”

We Believe

Open Therapeutics crowdsources orphan and dormant therapeutic intellectual properties (IP) to scientists around the world. The goal is pushing forward research that ordinarily would not generate a public value while particularly helping underserved scientists to collaborate.

How open science helps researchers succeed
Open access, open data, open source, and other open scholarship practices are growing in popularity and necessity. However, widespread adoption of these practices has not yet been achieved. One reason is that researchers are uncertain about how sharing their work will affect their careers. We review literature demonstrating that open research is associated with increases in citations, media attention, potential collaborators, job opportunities, and funding opportunities. These findings are evidence that open research practices bring significant benefits to researchers relative to more traditional closed practices.