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News > News > Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

Abstract
Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies….

Cripe TP, et al., Mol Ther Oncolytics. 2015;2. pii: 15016. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26436134

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