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News > News > Dr. Tim Cripe Presenting at the 11th International Oncolytic Virus Conference 2018, 9-12 April 2018, at Oxford University, UK

Dr. Tim Cripe Presenting at the 11th International Oncolytic Virus Conference 2018, 9-12 April 2018, at Oxford University, UK

A number of Dr. Cripe’s team is presenting at the 11th International Oncolytic Virus Conference 2018, 9-12 April 2018, at Oxford University, UK:

https://iovc.ada.wats-on.co.uk/Home.aspx

 

His team members presenting are:

Kery Streby (giving a talk regarding a paper):

OR004: Kery Streby (Nationwide Children’s Hospital/The Ohio State University, Columbus

OH) Intravenous administration of Seprehvir, an oncolytic herpes viroimmunotherapeutic, is

safe in children and young adults and induces sustained viremia – results of a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial

 

Nicholas Denton (giving a talk regarding a paper):

OR019: Nicholas Denton (Nationwide Childrens Hospital and The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH) Modulation of tumor associated macrophages enhances oncolytic herpes virotherapy in preclinical models of Ewing sarcoma

 

Leslee Sprague (poster presentation):

P107: Leslee Sprague (The Ohio State University) High mobility group box 1 influences HSV1716 spread and acts as an adjuvant to chemotherapy

 

Mary Frances Wedekind (poster presentation):

P048: Mary Frances Wedekind (Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus; Ohio State

University) Increased antitumor efficacy of PD-1 blockade combined with oncolytic herpes virotherapy in murine osteosarcoma correlates with increased CD8+/Treg ratio

 

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